Best Racquetball Racquet Reviews of 2023

Racquetball is a fun, fast-paced racquet sport that can be enjoyed by players of all ages. Whether you’re just starting out, or you’ve been playing for years, it’s important to have the right racquetball racquet to help you play your best.

In this article, we’ll take a look at the best and most popular racquetball racquets for beginner and intermediate players. We’ll also discuss key factors to consider so you know exactly how to choose a racquetball racquet. We also provide some tips on how to select the right racket for your individual playing style.

So, whether you’re looking for your first racquetball racquet, or you’re in the market for an upgrade, read on for the best beginner and intermediate racquets, as well as the best cheap racquetball racquet available today.

3 Best Racquetball Racquets

As racquetball players ourselves, we understand that choosing a Racquetball racquet is one of the most important decisions any racquetball player can make.

Choose the right racket and you can take your game to a whole new level. Choose the wrong racquet and you’ll feel like you’ve taken 10 steps back. Whether you’re a total newbie to the sport of racquetball and you want to get started in the best way possible or you’ve been playing for a while and feel like you’ve outgrown your current racquet, choosing the best racquetball racquet for your needs is very important.

We aim to help you make the right choice of racket by reviewing the best racquetball racquets on the market today. We personally tested all the racquets on our list, which is why we can personally recommend them to you.

Some of these rackets have been around for a while but their popularity with players have shown that they deliver what players need on the court time and time again.

BEST RACQUETS

RACKET NAME

RACKET IMAGE

BEST BEGINNER RACQUETBALL RACQUET

BEST RACQUETBALL RACQUET FOR INTERMEDIATE PLAYER

BEST CHEAP RACQUETBALL RACQUET

Best Beginner Racquetball Racquet

Wilson Striker Racquetball Racquet Review

 

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Wilson Striker Specifications

Unstrung Weight: 205g

Strung Weight: 221g

Swing Weight: 152

Swing Weight Rating: Medium = Power and Control

Balance: Even Balance

Head Size: 107 square inches / 690 square centimeters

Construction Material: Aluminum Alloy

Wilson Striker Review

In terms of value for money, the Wilson Striker racquetball racquet is an excellent entry-level racquet aimed at players just getting started in the game.

The frame is made of a heat-treated aluminum alloy that is designed to accommodate beginners with still developing techniques and who often mishit the ball during rallies.

The Wilson Striker racquetball racquet is heavier than most. This racquet weighs over 200 grams unstrung, making it a good choice for hard hitters who enjoy relaxing at the baseline and letting the racquet handle the bulk of the work.

With its even balance and medium swing weight rating, the Wilson Striker racquet offers a good combination of power and control. For a newcomer to the sport, this is exactly what he or she needs.

The Wilson Striker has a V-matrix frame, a technology which increases the sweet spot of the 107 square inch head.

At times when I did not hit the ball perfectly, I found that accuracy and power were maintained due to the racquet’s relatively large sweet spot.

Despite playing for extended periods of time, I found the grip to be comfortable to hold and play with.

This racket weighs over 220 grams when strung, which may be too heavy for some players. The increased weight, however, will increase power, allowing the swing to be made with a minimum amount of effort. The downside is that your arm may tire out faster when playing long rallies due to the extra weight.

Wilson Quality

Since 1915, Wilson has manufactured tennis racquets, and they are the official brand for USA Racquetball tournaments. This gives you peace of mind that they produce quality racquetball racquets.

In comparison to other beginner rackets, this racket is incredibly affordable and very easy to use. This is why the Wilson Striker racquetball racquet is our recommendation for the Best Beginner Racquetball Racquet.

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Best Racquetball Racquet For Intermediate Player

Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 Quad Racquetball Racquet Reviews

 

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Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 Specifications

Unstrung Weight: 165g

Strung Weight: 182g

Swing Weight: 155

Swing Weight Rating: Medium = Power and Control

Balance: Head Heavy

Head Size: 106 square inches / 684 square centimeters

Construction Material: Graphite

Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 Review

The Gearbox GB 250 Feather Quad racquetball racquet is a great option for all player types, however intermediate players will benefit the most from this racquet.

A number of the Gearbox GB 250 Feather’s features encourage control, while others focus on producing power for your shots with less physical effort.

The racquet’s weight is classified as a light racquet, enabling excellent maneuverability and control.

The weight of this racquet is balanced in order to create a head-heavy racquet. The Gearbox GB 250 Feather compensates for the lack of power that a light weight racquet racquet provides by putting most of its weight at its head. The momentum generated by the head heavy balance generates its own force and power. So it basically adds power to a control game.

The swing weight of the Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 Quad racquetball racquet is 155 kg x cm² which means it falls into the category of a medium swing weight racquet. I found the swing weight had a good balance between control and power while I was using it on the court.

The head of the racquet is a pretty standard 106 square inches.

When using this racquet I found the Quadraform head shape and light and easy-to-maneuver graphite frame material enhanced my control of the ball.

Quadraform racquet heads offer a large sweet spot and a focus on control over power.

When using this racquet I could understand how the head shape is designed for control, while it was obvious that the frame incorporates technology and design to maximize power.

Durable

In order to make the frame of the racquet as solid as possible, it is primarily made up of high modulus premium graphite.

Graphite is a lightweight and durable material commonly found in high quality racquetball racquets such as the Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 Quad.

The Gearbox GB 250 Feather 165 racquetball racquet is our choice for the best racquetball racquet for the intermediate player who wants a good balance between control and power.

With its light weight construction, medium swing weight, its Quadraform head shape which has a head heavy balance, and its comfortable grip you can’t go wrong choosing this racquet.

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Best Cheap Racquetball Racquet

HEAD MX Fire Racquetball Racquet Review

 

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HEAD MX Fire Specifications

Unstrung Weight: 190g

Strung Weight: 207g

Swing Weight: 140

Swing Weight Rating: Medium = Control and Power

Balance: Head Heavy

Head Size: 107 square inches / 690 square centimeters

Construction Material: Alloy/Metallix

HEAD MX Fire Review

The HEAD MX Fire racquetball racquet is our choice for the best cheap racquetball racquet because of it’s very reasonable budget friendly price and it’s good overall performance. 

The HEAD MX is 190g unstrung which puts it in the heavy weight category of racquetball racquets. When I was playing with this racquet the heavy weight was a definite advantage from a control perspective. I was able to play my shots with minimal effort and was able to control the ball easily off the racquet without trying to swing the racquet too hard.

The swing weight of the MX Fire is 140 kg x cm² puts it in the light swing weight category, but I must say that it felt more like a medium swing weight racket to me with great control and some power.

I felt that the head heavy balance of the HEAD MX Fire is what gave me the extra power that this heavy racquet might have lacked otherwise, which is one of the reasons why I chose this racket as the best cheap racquetball racquet. It gives you both control and power. This is ideal for beginner and intermediate racquetball players.

The head size is a standard 107 square inches which is big enough to put that heavy frame into use. The only complaint is the fact that a heavy racket with a head heavy balance such as the HEAD MX Fire isn’t the best option if you tend to have long rallies. You need to understand that your forearm, arm and shoulder will get fatigued during a long game. Just finish the points quickly 😉

HEAD Quality

Cheap racquetball racquets are often an expensive option in the long run because cheap construction materials don’t tend to last long before they break. With HEAD using it’s trademarked  alloy/Metallix construction, this is not a problem with the MX Fire. Carbon fibers and crystalline metal alloy are combined in a specially designed matrix which makes this racquet very strong and durable.

After testing a number of cheap racquetball racquets I settled on the HEAD MX Fire as the best cheap racquetball racquet because in this very inexpensive racket you have a racquet that gives you control and power in a very durable frame. It’s an ideal option if you’re on a tight budget or if this is your first racquet and you don’t want to break the bank while you’re figuring out what playing style you are best at.

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How To Choose A Good Racquetball Racquet

Selecting a racquetball racquet that’s perfect for your own personal preferences requires considerable thought and effort. But before picking that perfect Racquetball racquet, you need to know what to consider when choosing a racquet. In this section of the article we’ll discuss some of the factors you should consider when choosing a racquetball racquet, such as weight, balance, and grip size, among other things. And finally, we’ll give you a few tips on how to choose the right racquet for your playing style.

Choosing A Racquetball Racquet Weight

The three weight classes of racquetball racquets are Heavy, Medium, and Light. Below I’ll describe which weight class of racket suits what type of racquetball player. This is the first factor to consider when choosing a racquetball racquet, but is very important to not only help your overall game but also prevent injuries.

racquetball weightHeavy Racquetball Racquet (Unstrung over 185g)

Choose a heavy racquet if you want more control or have a slow swing.

In most cases, these players are relatively new to the sport. Additionally, they include veteran players who have transitioned from power-intensive games to a more controlled style of play.

The heavier the racquet, the more power you will generate without having to swing as hard. A heavy racquetball racquet may be a great choice if you lack a strong swing, are older, or are more concerned with accuracy than power. Also, since they don’t require you to swing hard while you play, they’re preferred by those who care more about ball placement and control.

If you have an arm or shoulder issue, a heavy racquet will also be a better choice since you won’t need to swing your arm as hard when playing your shots.

Medium Racquetball Racquet (Unstrung 170-185g)

Choose a medium racquet if you’re just starting out or have a moderate swing.

These are the types of players most commonly encountered. This category includes tournament players as well as weekend warriors looking to get a little more from their game.

Most casual players use medium-weight racquets. Generally, they give you a good balance of power and control. Choosing this racquetball racquet weight is probably the safest option if you’re new to the game. In the future, once you know what your preferred playstyle is, you can always upgrade to a lighter or heavier racquet.

Light Racquetball Racquet (Unstrung 150-165g)

Choose a light racquet if you have a fast swing.

Designed to maximize maneuverability, these racquets cater to players who generate their own power. Having a lighter racquet will make maneuvering and swinging it faster easier. For those who like to whack the ball as hard as possible, a lighter racquet is a better choice. Due to its light weight, it won’t tire you out during matches. This is one of the reasons why many professional players choose lighter racquets.

A lighter racquet doesn’t give you more power. It will, however, make it easier to hit the ball hard without it flying everywhere. Staying accurate will be difficult if you swing hard with a heavy racquet.

A light racquet should not be used if you have any kind of arm or shoulder injury. You will be less likely to throw out your arm when you use a heavy racquet, and your elbows will feel more comfortable with the heavier weight.

Determine The Desired Racquetball Racket Balance Point

Racquetball racquets can be classified as head-heavy, even balanced, or head-light, just like in many other racquet sports.

Depending on the weight distribution, a racket’s balance can be evenly distributed or shifted more towards the head or grip. The center of gravity for a racket (static balance point) is measured in millimeters or inches from its butt end.

The racket is considered head heavy if the balance point is closer to the head, and head light if it is closer to the grip. Weight typically centers around the throat of a racket if it has an even balance.

Even Balanced Racquetball Racquets

The balance point of an even balance racket is usually eleven inches from the bottom of the handle. This type of racket offers the maneuverability of a head-light racket with the power of a head-heavy racket.

Even balanced racquets are suitable for new or versatile players.

An even balance racquetball racquet has a good balance between power and control. This is the type of racquet to try if you are not sure which balance racquet you want or if you generally play a versatile type of game.

When the balance is not listed on the racquet, such as “head-heavy” or “head-light”, it’s safe to assume that the racquet is even balanced.

racquetball racquet balance pointHead-Light Racquetball Racquets

A head-light racquetball racquet has a center of gravity below 11 inches (28 cm) from the bottom of the handle.

If accuracy is your top priority, choose a head light racquet.

A head light raquetball racquet will feel lighter than it actually is, and it will be easier to maneuver these racquets quickly. This is an excellent option for control players or those who like to play off the front court.

Those who use a lot of wrist-snap to hit the ball may prefer the feel of these racquets. You will also get more pop out of your wrist because of the lower center of gravity.

Head-Heavy Racquetball Racquets

Weight is distributed towards the top of the head-heavy racquet. This results in a higher center of gravity than 11 inches (28 cm) from the handle’s butt.

If you want to dominate your opponents with power play, you should get a head heavy racquet.

The head-heavy racket increases swing speed and momentum to generate more power.

It means that when you hit the ball, it will fly off the strings. It’s a good choice if you prefer a power-focused game and don’t mind losing some maneuverability.

Their power can be a great advantage for players who like to play powerfully from the back of the court. As a way of compensating for their lack of power, light rackets are often head-heavy.

Determine The Ideal Racquetball Racquet Swing Weight

Swing weight for racquetball racquets, expressed in grams, is determined by measuring the weight of the racket in relation to its length, balance, and head size. It measures the weight of a racket when swung. As the number decreases, it becomes easier to swing and more maneuverable. It is harder to swing a racket with a higher swing weight, but it is more stable on impact.

High Swing Weight(160+) For High Power

Power is generated with the least amount of effort or swing speed with higher swing weight racquets. A power player often drives from the backcourt and hits pass shots and down the line shots. In addition, many new players are in this category since they have not yet learned how to control the ball or determine the angles on the court.

racquetball racquet swing weightMedium Swing Weight(150-160) For Control And Power

A medium swing racquetball racquet is the easiest swing weight for any player to use. The majority of these racquets are around an even balance with a head-light or head-heavy bias of +/- 2 points. A balanced player is able to utilize both passing power and touch placement to their advantage at any given point in a game.

Low Swing Weight(less than 150) For Control

A low swing weight racquet has less momentum during the swing, making quick shot adjustments and soft touch shots easier. It is more common for control players to attack the front wall and to rely on strategic ball placement to defeat their opponents. To keep their opponents off-balance, this type of player uses more lobs, ceiling balls, and pinches.

Choose Your Racquetball Racquet Grip Size

You will have better control over your racquet if you have a good grip size. If your grip is too small, the racquet will twist in your hand and eventually cause Tennis Elbow. It is possible to develop Tennis Elbow from prolonged overuse of a grip that is too large, which would decrease wrist snap on serves.

A grip that is too small is easier to build up than modifying one that is too large. When in doubt, go with the smaller size.

The grip size of a handle is measured by its circumference in inches. Generally, racquetball racquet grip sizes range from small (3 5/8″), which is suitable for most players, to large (3 7/8″ or 3 15/16″), which is suitable for larger hands.

What is the best grip size for you? Players with a smaller grip usually have a faster wrist action, resulting in more power. Unfortunately, the racquet might have a tendency to twist without much palm on the handle, making it difficult to control.

Generally, a larger grip allows for more contact between the hand and the racquet. This allows for better feel and more control. It is possible that there is less power because of a lack of racquet head speed, which can be detrimental for some players.

Guidelines

Choosing the right grip size for you is truly a matter of personal preference, but here are a few general guidelines.

It is recommended that your ring finger touches your palm when gripping your racquetball racquet handle. Your glove size is another way to determine your grip size. The larger grip might be more comfortable if you wear a large or X-large glove.

Another way to determine personal preference is to grasp the racquet handle firmly, but not too firmly. Then close your eyes and swing your wrist back and forth without moving your arm. Increase the wrist speed gradually, but never to full speed, and experiment with various grip sizes to get a sense of the overall feel.

Choose A Reputable Racquetball Racquet Brand

There are many racquetball racquets on the market today. Players just starting out in the sport of racquetball often want to spend as little as possible on a new racket. The temptation is to choose the cheapest possible racquet, even if you’ve never heard of the brand or it’s not got a good track record of quality sports equipment. Inferior materials and manufacturing processes often result in these types of racquets breaking very easily or giving a bad playing experience. This is why it’s a good idea to buy a racquetball racquet that is made by a reputable brand.

Best Racquetball Racquet Brands

The best racquetball racquet brands are HEAD, Wilson, Gearbox, E-Force, Pro Kennex, Python and Macgregor. If you choose racquetball racquets from these brands then you’re assured a quality product. 

Stick To Your Budget

Racquetball racquets range in price from as little as $30 for a basic beginner racket to well over $200 for a more high end racquet. Before you take into consideration all the factors we listed above in choosing the best racquet for you, it’s important to set your budget upfront and sticking to it.

If you are disciplined in sticking to your budget, then it’s a great way of eliminating rackets that exceed your budget and so narrowing your choices down. In these uncertain economic times it’s also a good way of not overspending and ensuring that you have enough money in the bank(or credit card) to cover your monthly expenses.

Conclusion

This article is meant to help racquetball players choose a new racquet. If you’re brand new to the sport of racquetball then it’s important that you start your racquetball journey in the best possible way. This is exactly why we tested numerous racquetball racquets until we found the racket that provides the best features that would suit a beginner player’s playing style. We did exactly the same thing when testing racquets to find the best racquetball racquet for an intermediate player. To find the best cheap racquetball racquet we chose the best racket that was reasonably priced, but could be used by beginner to intermediate racquetball players who wanted to enjoy themselves on the court.

We also wanted to arm you with the information you need. Its so that you know how to choose a good racquetball racquet. Personal preference is important, but knowing what factors to consider when choosing a racquetball racquet is incredibly valuable.

If you want answers to your most burning Racquetball Questions then take a look at our Racquetball Page.

If you have found this information helpful or want to comment on the article please let us know.

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